NOrumbega Logo
test Documents Resources Artifacts

 The Humphrey & Lucy 
Chadbourne Archaeology Site


Every summer from 1995 to 2007 excavation took place at the Chadbourne Site (ca. 1643-1690) in South Berwick, Maine.  This project of the Old Berwick Historical Society and the Chadbourne Family Association is directed by Emerson W. Baker, Ph.D., Professor of History at Salem State College. Artifacts from the dig are on display at the Counting House Museum, in South Berwick.


 logo based on an excavated seal
See artifacts from the site
See site plans and photos
Read a site report
Educational Resources 
Chadbourne Dig Humor

You may want to visit these web sites:
Old Berwick Historical Society
Chadbourne Family Association


1665 map detail

The dig has uncovered invaluable archaeological information about life for the first generation of English settlers in southern Maine. It was also a successful education program, for every year between 60 and seventy volunteers participated in the dig. In addition, people continue to learn about the project through on-going lectures, and an exhibit at Old Berwick Historical Society's Counting House Museum.  
Built sometime after Humphrey Chadbourne Sr. purchased the land from the local Native Americans in 1643, and apparently destroyed in 1690 during King William's War,  the site is archaeological "time capsule."   It presents a complete and well-preserved record of life in Maine in the late 1600s. The fact that the Chadbournes were one of the wealthiest families in the colony means that they left many objects behind for archaeologists..
  To date over 30,000 artifacts have been    recovered. These broken bits of the past have no monetary value, but they are truly priceless to archaeologists for they tell us about everyday life in early Maine. Most are every-day sort of items such as hand-forged nails, window glass, bits of stew bones, or stems from clay pipe stems. Buttons, a spur, an ax blade, a hammer head, part of a saw blade, a chisel and other tools all reveal details of daily life for the Chadbournes.
"HL C" engraved spoon  for Humphrey and Lucy Chadbourne.
 

back to Emerson Baker's Home Page    | back to History Department Home Page
back to Salem State College Home Page

 





























  To date over 30,000 artifacts have been    recovered. These broken bits of the past have no monetary value, but they are truly priceless to archaeologists for they tell us about everyday life in early Maine. Most are every-day sort of items such as hand-forged nails, window glass, bits of stew bones, or stems from clay pipe stems. Buttons, a spur, an ax blade, a hammer head, part of a saw blade, a chisel and other tools all reveal details of daily life for the Chadbournes.
"HL C" engraved spoon  for Humphrey and Lucy Chadbourne.
 









ARCHAEOLOGY
Information on the following archaeology sites is currently included in Virtual Norumbega.
More sites will be added in the future, as time permits.

Chadbourne Site, ca.  1643-1690, South Berwick, Maine

Lewis Bean Site, ca. 1695-1757, York, Maine
Shepard Site, ca. 1679-1770, Kittery, Maine
Phips Site, ca. 1639-1676, Woolwich, Maine

Hitchcock Site, ca. 1636-1690, Biddeford Pool,  Maine


Sites that will be added in the future:

Point Christian Manor, ca. 1634-1643, York, Maine
Hilton Site, ca. 1635-1710, Newfields, New Hampshire
Clarke & Lake Company, ca. 1654-1676, Arrowsic, Maine
Sagadahoc Island, ca. 1650-1690, Maine